Tag Archives: Wall Street Journal

Pound for Pounds

01/26/2014 -- BOSTON, Mass. -- Chef Michael Leviton, owner of Boston-area restaurants Area Four, A4 Pizza and Lumiere, works through a clean and jerk during his workout at InnerCity Weightlifting as his trainer Joe Sierra observes on Jan. 25, 2014. Leviton used to mentor Sierra, and continued the relationship through InnerCity. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

01/26/2014 — BOSTON, Mass. — Chef Michael Leviton, owner of Boston-area restaurants Area Four, A4 Pizza and Lumiere, works through a clean and jerk during his workout at InnerCity Weightlifting as his trainer Joe Sierra observes on Jan. 25, 2014. Leviton used to mentor Sierra, and continued the relationship through InnerCity. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

The Area Four restaurant has a special place in my heart.

Not only do they make what I think is the best pizza in town, but it also happens to be the spot where my girlfriend, Samantha, and I were first introduced to each other. You can imagine how excited I was when I got the call from the Wall Street Journal back in January to photograph another “What’s Your Workout” piece on the chef and owner Michael Leviton.

My assignment was to photograph the chef at InnerCity Weightlifting, where he works out on weekends with his trainer Joe. InnerCity is an organization that gets urban youth off the streets and into the gym, and Mike has been involved with the team there since hearing founder Jon Feinman speak at a forum in 2012. They’ve got a great story themselves, as well.

01/26/2014 -- BOSTON, Mass. -- Chef Michael Leviton, owner of Boston-area restaurants Area Four, A4 Pizza and Lumiere, does a weighted pull up during his workout at InnerCity Weightlifting on Jan. 25, 2014. Leviton used to mentor his current trainer Joe Sierra, and continued the relationship through InnerCity. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

01/26/2014 -- BOSTON, Mass. -- Chef Michael Leviton, owner of Boston-area restaurants Area Four, A4 Pizza and Lumiere, works out at InnerCity Weightlifting with his trainer Joe Sierra on Jan. 25, 2014. Leviton used to mentor Sierra, and continued the relationship through InnerCity.  (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

01/26/2014 — BOSTON, Mass. — Chef Michael Leviton, owner of Boston-area restaurants Area Four, A4 Pizza and Lumiere, works out at InnerCity Weightlifting with his trainer Joe Sierra on Jan. 25, 2014. Leviton used to mentor Sierra, and continued the relationship through InnerCity. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

After Mike’s CrossFit-style circuit, we moved on to my favorite part of any workout — the post-lift meal at Area Four in Cambridge. The pizza here is easily my favorite in the area, so spending some time with the chef and his team in the kitchen and getting to know him, his wife, Karyn, and their kids was a treat. They loved the story about me and Sam, too!

01/26/2014 -- CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Chef Michael Leviton prepares a pizza with his children Sam Leviton, 4, and Isadora Goldman-Leviton, 11, at his restaurant Area Four in Cambridge's Kendall Square on Jan. 25, 2014. Area Four started out as a pizza and coffee shop concept, and has since expanded into a second pizza-only location and a food truck. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

01/26/2014 — CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Chef Michael Leviton prepares a pizza with his children Sam Leviton, 4, and Isadora Goldman-Leviton, 11, at his restaurant Area Four in Cambridge's Kendall Square on Jan. 25, 2014. Area Four started out as a pizza and coffee shop concept, and has since expanded into a second pizza-only location and a food truck. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

01/26/2014 -- CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Chef Michael Leviton prepares a pizza at his restaurant Area Four in Cambridge's Kendall Square on Jan. 25, 2014. Area Four started out as a pizza and coffee shop concept, and has since expanded into a second pizza-only location and a food truck.  (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

01/26/2014 — CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Chef Michael Leviton prepares a pizza at his restaurant Area Four in Cambridge's Kendall Square on Jan. 25, 2014. Area Four started out as a pizza and coffee shop concept, and has since expanded into a second pizza-only location and a food truck. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

01/26/2014 -- CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Isadora Goldman-Leviton, 11, serves herself a slice of the pizza she prepared with her father, Chef Michael Leviton at his restaurant Area Four in Cambridge's Kendall Square on Jan. 25, 2014. Area Four started out as a pizza and coffee shop concept, and has since expanded into a second pizza-only location and a food truck. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

01/26/2014 — CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Isadora Goldman-Leviton, 11, serves herself a slice of the pizza she prepared with her father, Chef Michael Leviton at his restaurant Area Four in Cambridge's Kendall Square on Jan. 25, 2014. Area Four started out as a pizza and coffee shop concept, and has since expanded into a second pizza-only location and a food truck. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

01/26/2014 -- CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Chef Michael Leviton poses for a portrait at his restaurant Area Four in Cambridge's Kendall Square on Jan. 25, 2014. Area Four started out as a pizza and coffee shop concept, and has since expanded into a second pizza-only location and a food truck. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

01/26/2014 — CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Chef Michael Leviton poses for a portrait at his restaurant Area Four in Cambridge's Kendall Square on Jan. 25, 2014. Area Four started out as a pizza and coffee shop concept, and has since expanded into a second pizza-only location and a food truck. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

Be sure to check out the article while it’s still in front of the paywall.

Many thanks to my assigning editor Kate Lord, who has since jumped into the freelance ranks. Look her up!

Crystal Clear

There are a lot of perks to being a news photographer, but one of the best is getting to meet interesting people every time you go out for an assignment.

Last month, the Wall Street Journal gave me a shout about photographing a chandelier cleaner going about his work in the posh Beacon Hill neighborhood of Boston. That’s how I met Keith Campbell, the owner of Acu-Bright chandelier cleaners.

Keith was being profiled because he invented a method machine that makes cleaning the crystals of a chandelier possible without disassembling the whole rig. Being completely ignorant to the world of chandeliers — like 98 percent of the rest of the world, most likely — I had no idea that the traditional method of cleaning involves a complete disassembly, individual cleaning, and then reassembly. Obviously, for a big Las Vegas casino, that would involve a lot of downtime, and time is money.

Acu-Bright’s method involves ultrasound and water. It’s as simple as a cylinder of vibrating water, which shakes the debris and dust right off the crystals as they hang. Without disassembly, what would take about a week for the larger chandeliers takes about a day with Acu-Bright. Keith says he’s been a hit, and he’s got a lot of stories about some of the clients he’s served, some of whom make him sign non-disclosure agreements. Such is the nature of the rich and famous, I guess!

Read more at the Wall Street Journal while it’s in front of the paywall.

02/03/2014 -- BOSTON, Mass. -- Keith Campbell, President of Acu-Bright, cleans a chandelier in a client's home in Boston on Feb. 3, 2014. Campbell invented the Acu-Bright cleaning system, which uses an ultrasonic process and water to clean the delicate parts of a chandelier in a fraction of the time of the traditional cleaning process of disassembly. CREDIT: Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal CHANDELIER (Kelvin Ma/Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

02/03/2014 — BOSTON, Mass. — Keith Campbell, President of Acu-Bright, cleans a chandelier in a client's home in Boston on Feb. 3, 2014. Campbell invented the Acu-Bright cleaning system, which uses an ultrasonic process and water to clean the delicate parts of a chandelier in a fraction of the time of the traditional cleaning process of disassembly. CREDIT: Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal CHANDELIER (Kelvin Ma/Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

02/03/2014 -- BOSTON, Mass. -- Keith Campbell, President of Acu-Bright, pulls a clean chandelier crystal out of the Acu-Bright's cleaning container in a client's home in Boston on Feb. 3, 2014. Campbell invented the Acu-Bright system, which uses an ultrasonic process and water to clean the delicate parts of a chandelier in a fraction of the time of the traditional cleaning process of disassembly. CREDIT: Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal CHANDELIER (Kelvin Ma/Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

02/03/2014 — BOSTON, Mass. — Keith Campbell, President of Acu-Bright, pulls a clean chandelier crystal out of the Acu-Bright's cleaning container in a client's home in Boston on Feb. 3, 2014. Campbell invented the Acu-Bright system, which uses an ultrasonic process and water to clean the delicate parts of a chandelier in a fraction of the time of the traditional cleaning process of disassembly.

02/03/2014 -- BOSTON, Mass. -- Keith Campbell, President of Acu-Bright, cleans a chandelier in a client's home in Boston on Feb. 3, 2014. Campbell invented the Acu-Bright cleaning system, which uses an ultrasonic process and water to clean the delicate parts of a chandelier in a fraction of the time of the traditional cleaning process of disassembly. CREDIT: Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal CHANDELIER (Kelvin Ma/Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

02/03/2014 — BOSTON, Mass. — Keith Campbell, President of Acu-Bright, cleans a chandelier in a client's home in Boston on Feb. 3, 2014. Campbell invented the Acu-Bright cleaning system, which uses an ultrasonic process and water to clean the delicate parts of a chandelier in a fraction of the time of the traditional cleaning process of disassembly.

A Most Unconventional Core Workout

I’ve been sitting on this one for quite a bit, having photographed this assignment back in August, but it was easily one of my favorites of the summer. The Wall Street Journal has a weekly feature called, “What’s Your Workout,” which features a variety of working folks who do unconventional things to work out. Last year, I photographed Major League Lacrosse player Jordan Burke’s Harvard Stadium workout (which, frankly, doesn’t seem all that unconventional when you consider in my Wednesday morning routine), so I had an idea of the concept when the folks at the Journal got in touch about their latest subject.

Phyllis LeBlanc is the President and CEO at Harbor Sweets, a local chocolate company up in Salem, Mass. With a job like that, she has to be pretty disciplined with her health and fitness. For Phyllis, the answer was competitive horse dressage, which was a natural match for a lifelong rider. Having no knowledge of the sport, I chatted up coach Cindi Wylie during Phyllis’ session about what exactly it was I was photographing. She likens horse dressage to skiing, as the rider’s ability to maintain control of the 1,200-pound animal comes from solid core strength with subtle movements and quick reflexes.

It was a fascinating look into a completely foreign world to me — one of the best perks of this job! Be sure to read more about Phyllis’ story at the WSJ site before it gets put behind the paywall.

08/27/2013 -- GEORGETOWN, Mass. -- Phyllis LeBlanc, President and CEO of Salem, Mass.-based chocolate company Harbor Sweets, paces her dressage horse Chiron through a workout as her trainer Cindi Wylie checks her form at Quarterline Dressage in Georgetown, Mass., on Aug. 27, 2013. LeBlanc, who has 30 years of experience as a competitive dressage rider, says she finds comfort in the process of preparing a dressage horse. Riding involves core and leg strength, as well as fine motor control to maintain control of the horse, which Wylie compares to skiing. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

08/27/2013 — GEORGETOWN, Mass. — Phyllis LeBlanc, President and CEO of Salem, Mass.-based chocolate company Harbor Sweets, paces her dressage horse Chiron through a workout as her trainer Cindi Wylie checks her form at Quarterline Dressage in Georgetown, Mass., on Aug. 27, 2013. LeBlanc, who has 30 years of experience as a competitive dressage rider, says she finds comfort in the process of preparing a dressage horse. Riding involves core and leg strength, as well as fine motor control to maintain control of the horse, which Wylie compares to skiing. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

08/27/2013 -- GEORGETOWN, Mass. -- Phyllis LeBlanc, President and CEO of Salem, Mass.-based chocolate company Harbor Sweets, wraps her dressage horse Chiron in polo wraps for support before a workout at Quarterline Dressage in Georgetown, Mass., on Aug. 27, 2013. LeBlanc, who has 30 years of experience as a competitive dressage rider, says she finds comfort in the process of preparing a dressage horse. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

08/27/2013 — GEORGETOWN, Mass. — Phyllis LeBlanc, President and CEO of Salem, Mass.-based chocolate company Harbor Sweets, wraps her dressage horse Chiron in polo wraps for support before a workout at Quarterline Dressage in Georgetown, Mass., on Aug. 27, 2013. LeBlanc, who has 30 years of experience as a competitive dressage rider, says she finds comfort in the process of preparing a dressage horse. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

08/27/2013 -- GEORGETOWN, Mass. -- Phyllis LeBlanc, President and CEO of Salem, Mass.-based chocolate company Harbor Sweets, puts away her riding equipment in her locker after a workout at Quarterline Dressage in Georgetown, Mass., on Aug. 27, 2013. LeBlanc, who has 30 years of experience as a competitive dressage rider, says she finds comfort in the process of preparing a dressage horse.  (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

08/27/2013 — GEORGETOWN, Mass. — Phyllis LeBlanc, President and CEO of Salem, Mass.-based chocolate company Harbor Sweets, puts away her riding equipment in her locker after a workout at Quarterline Dressage in Georgetown, Mass., on Aug. 27, 2013. LeBlanc, who has 30 years of experience as a competitive dressage rider, says she finds comfort in the process of preparing a dressage horse. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

08/27/2013 -- GEORGETOWN, Mass. -- Phyllis LeBlanc, President and CEO of Salem, Mass.-based chocolate company Harbor Sweets, checks her form in the mirror while pacing her dressage horse Chiron through a workout at Quarterline Dressage in Georgetown, Mass., on Aug. 27, 2013.(Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

08/27/2013 — GEORGETOWN, Mass. — Phyllis LeBlanc, President and CEO of Salem, Mass.-based chocolate company Harbor Sweets, checks her form in the mirror while pacing her dressage horse Chiron through a workout at Quarterline Dressage in Georgetown, Mass., on Aug. 27, 2013. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

08/27/2013 -- GEORGETOWN, Mass. -- Phyllis LeBlanc, President and CEO of Salem, Mass.-based chocolate company Harbor Sweets, talks to her dressage horse Chiron after a workout at Quarterline Dressage in Georgetown, Mass., on Aug. 27, 2013. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

08/27/2013 — GEORGETOWN, Mass. — Phyllis LeBlanc, President and CEO of Salem, Mass.-based chocolate company Harbor Sweets, talks to her dressage horse Chiron after a workout at Quarterline Dressage in Georgetown, Mass., on Aug. 27, 2013. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

08/27/2013 -- GEORGETOWN, Mass. -- Phyllis LeBlanc, President and CEO of Salem, Mass.-based chocolate company Harbor Sweets, cleans the shoes of her dressage horse Chiron after a workout at Quarterline Dressage in Georgetown, Mass., on Aug. 27, 2013. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

08/27/2013 — GEORGETOWN, Mass. — Phyllis LeBlanc, President and CEO of Salem, Mass.-based chocolate company Harbor Sweets, cleans the shoes of her dressage horse Chiron after a workout at Quarterline Dressage in Georgetown, Mass., on Aug. 27, 2013. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

08/27/2013 -- GEORGETOWN, Mass. -- Phyllis LeBlanc, President and CEO of Salem, Mass.-based chocolate company Harbor Sweets, poses for a portrait with her dressage horse Chiron at Quarterline Dressage in Georgetown, Mass., on Aug. 27, 2013. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)

08/27/2013 — GEORGETOWN, Mass. — Phyllis LeBlanc, President and CEO of Salem, Mass.-based chocolate company Harbor Sweets, poses for a portrait with her dressage horse Chiron at Quarterline Dressage in Georgetown, Mass., on Aug. 27, 2013. (Kelvin Ma for the Wall Street Journal)