Tick. Tock.

I grew up in Boston, and I’ve spent plenty of time walking through Downtown Crossing and the surrounding areas of the Freedom Trail. The Old South Meeting House was always something of an afterthought — just a building you’d happen to pass on the way from the Common to Faneuil Hall.

Monday, I was assigned to easily one of the coolest assignments I’ve had in a long time. A clocksmith by the name of David Hochstrasser was up in the steeple, restoring the clock to make sure everything was on time. It’s a painstaking process, I can imagine, and with all the gears involved, quite an impressive feat, and very cool for a history geek like me. Here’s some photos of him in action, plus a link to the Boston Herald’s story:

12.21.2009 — BOSTON — Clocksmith David Hochstrasser checks the time after restoring the steeple clock of the Old South Meeting House on Dec. 21, 2009. The restoration of clock, built in 1766 by Gawen Brown, involved no modifications save for a faceplate to commemorate the date of the project.


12.21.2009 — BOSTON — Clocksmith David Hochstrasser puts the final touches on his restoration of the clock in the steeple of the Old South Meeting House on Dec. 21, 2009. The restoration of clock, built in 1766 by Gawen Brown, involved no modifications save for a faceplate to commemorate the date of the project.


12.21.2009 — Clocksmith David Hochstrasser restored the steeple clock in the Old South Meeting House on Dec. 21, 2009. The restoration of clock, built in 1766 by Gawen Brown, who left his signature on this gear, involved no modifications save for a faceplate to commemorate the date of the project.

12.21.2009 — BOSTON — Clocksmith David Hochstrasser restored the steeple clock in the Old South Meeting House on Dec. 21, 2009. The restoration of clock, built in 1766 by Gawen Brown, involved no modifications save for a faceplate to commemorate the date of the project.

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